PVD

Posterior Vitreous Detachment. That’s the official diagnosis for my left eye. Some of the floaters will clear up. Some will not. The next 3 months I am susceptible to retina detachment. Crap on a stick frozen in the freezer, one that doesn’t automatically defrost either.

I should carry a business card that has my name and below it – “Weird physical anomalies. Can I join your circus?” Though I have to say the retina “expert” I saw Thursday says everyone gets PVD to a certain extent as they age. I have no idea what he is talking about. I don’t know anyone else who ever got it. I know one guy who went blind in one eye when his retina detached.

And for the record if you see any sort of medical “expert” who wears a bow tie, is training someone while they are examining you, gives you a glossy preprinted booklet to read about your “symptoms” – these people are assholes. Solid. Good luck talking to them. Good luck asking questions because their response is either “read the book” or “that is not accurate.” And yes, I did fire him. After I saw him. Canceled the follow up. Screw him. There has to be someone better who doesn’t hand out printed material for patients to read who are having vision problems. Dumb as the day is long. Or maybe just condescending. Either/or.

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18 Comments

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18 responses to “PVD

  1. Crap on a stick in a freezer, but the freakin’ power is out and it’s thawing!

    Back when I had a bout of iritis I was told I have pigment dispersion syndrome, which could clog the drainage of my eye and lead to glaucoma. But so far so good. More recently it’s been the age-related softening of my vision — I had to buy my first pair of reading glasses.

    • Nada

      Dang, Gene. I read about your pigment dispersion syndrome. These things scare the crap on a stick out of me. I’m fond of seeing. Very fond.

  2. Nada you take care, you hear. Don’t know if there is anything you can do but heal.

  3. Sophie Monk

    As the stuff is trying to detach it can tug on your retina causing distorted vision at times. Apparently, once safely detached, it sinks to the bottom, rattles around, but is less troublesome. More common in very short-sighted people as they get older I was told.

    • Nada

      Thank you so much for this info, Sophie Monk!! No one has told me this and it is not in the book the “expert” gave me. I can see that the largest and darkest floaters are sticking more to the bottom of my vision today. Hopefully they will tack themselves down because the wiggling around makes me motion sick. The “buck shot” floaters seem to be fading some today too. I guess it takes time and patience. I have none of that.

  4. Dr. Duh. *headshaking* Oh my dog, our world has become so mentally dull. Has he already made it through medical school? A bow tie? Really? Was he wearing a tux?

    • Nada

      He was wearing arrogance like a banner. I think I am going to send their booklet back to them with a note, “Maybe you should consider some other form of communication to your vision impaired patients.”

  5. Ya know, now that I think about it, a couple years ago when I went to have an eye exam because I thought my contact prescription needed updating, that’s what happened. I got new contacts, went home, and had an even harder time reading than I did before. I required contacts, topped by reading glasses, the use of a magnifying glass, and a very bright light. Went back and told the doc, I don’t think this prescription is right. When he took another look, he discovered I had “very-fast growing” cataracts in both eyes. I am nearly certain that they didn’t grow in two weeks. How did he miss them the first time he examined my eyes?

    • Nada

      That is crazy. It seems too if you had very fast growing cataracts they would be grown by now. I don’t know what some of these guys do in medical school – or they see so many people they are asleep at the wheel.

  6. You have an excellent point about giving brochures to the vision-impaired! Was it at least big print? Unreal!

  7. AZ

    “Posterior Vitreous Detachment” sounds like Dr. speak for “Ass Falling Off.” I wonder is that’s what’s going on with me, I’ve got a floater in my left eye from the inside it looks like a large mouth bass floating around in the fluid of my eye. Up until recently all my floaters have been of the transparent variety, this one looks more solid and brown/tan in color. It’s been there a couple of weeks, but you know me I’m not one to see a doctor because I’m still aiming for “Surprise Demise.”

    If you get an eye patch and parrot, send me a photo — that picture should fetch a few bucks on Ebay.

    • Nada

      Mine looks just like that too – large mouth bass and he can open and close his mouth depending on how you move your eye – plus he has a suitcase. My cousin who was just visiting here said she got one of these last year. She is the one who mentioned her floater had a suitcase. Mine does too.

      I love that “Ass Falling Off.” I only wish that were the case and not eyeball falling off.

  8. Monte McClain

    Nada – bummed to hear this news. We’ve have’t been to Pacifica for a long time….need to get over there. Missing you here in the hood.

    • Nada

      I miss you too Monte, and all my buddies in the hood. Let me know if you are coming by. We have a nice picnic table in back and are a block from the beach.

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